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Mark and Monica Knight
Knight Real Estate of Boise
660 East Franklin Road - Suite 220

Meridian, ID 83642
Mark: (208) 577-1487

Email Mark
Monica: (208) 571-8379
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About the Area

Why live in Boise
Boise, Idaho, a city of over 211,473 that combines small town comforts with big city conveniences, consistently rates among the top U.S. communities to live.

Why? Maybe it’s because residents enjoy four distinct seasons but the weather is moderate enough to allow an average of 325 golfing days a year. Or maybe it’s the low crime rate, reasonable cost of living, or the commitment of corporations and individual citizens to preserving Boise’s quality of life. Thirty-two neighborhood associations promote that quality in the distinctive neighborhoods that constitute this rapidly growing urban center. 
 

 
Neighborhoods
Let’s look at some of those neighborhoods. We’ll start to the east, where you can still see remnants of the Oregon Trail as it headed into the Boise valley. Lucky Peak Reservoir, a major water source and recreational area, lies 10 miles east of Boise. Near it are corporate headquarters for Micron, and the neighborhoods of Surprise Valley, Columbia Village and Harris Ranch. 
 
 
Capitol
The Idaho State Capitol is the only statehouse in the country heated with natural geothermal hot water. Boise’s geothermal resource also heats the Victorian mansions lining Warm Springs Boulevard, the main road leading into town from the east. On this route you’ll discover the old Idaho Penitentiary, in use until 1973 but now open for tours, and the Idaho Botanical Gardens. 

 

Historic Living
The area known as Boise's North End was the City's first "suburban" development. First platted in 1878, the neighborhood was a small area covering only a few blocks between 9th and 13th Streets, from Fort Street north to Resseguie. Beginning in 1891 however, speculators began purchasing land in earnest, beginning a 25 year intensive building boom. 
 
 
Today and the Future
The North End was generally developed as a working and middle class neighborhood, hence the preponderance of modest bungalows; but the area is also unique for the mixture of housing stock that can be found there.

Harrison Boulevard is one of the main thoroughfares of the North End; the historic mansions of this tree-lined street set the tone for this old neighborhood. In recent years the area has attracted a large following of young couples with its charm, creating a renewed interest in one of Boise's original neighborhoods.

In the middle of the North End, is Hyde Park with its boutiques and popular eateries like Lucky 13. For more than 20 years the Hyde Park Street Fair, has set the tone for this fun neighborhood gathering spot. Spilling into Camel's Back Park, one of Boise's more popular open spaces, the fair attracts visitors from all over the Treasure Valley. In addition the North End has more churches per capita than any other neighborhood in the state, many of which are of historic significance. 

 

Welcome to Buhl, Idaho
The history of Buhl began with the vision of men who could see great potential hidden beneath the sagebrush-covered area. The U.S. government was interested in developing the west for settlement and provided financial assistance for early settlers under the Carey Act and the Bureau of Reclamation Act in the early 1900’s.

Eager financiers arrived in the area in the early 1900’s to look at the possibilities the land promised. Frank H. Buhl, a Sharon, Pennsylvania native, came in hopes of purchasing a mining operation, but finding the mine already sold he decided to look into investing in the proposed irrigation project. Along with Mr. I. B. Perrine and Peter Kimberly, the three men agreed that the project had great promise and formed a corporation to help the project reach completion.

The development of the irrigation system that they helped build changed the Magic Valley from Desert Brown to valley Green. Walter Filer was placed in charge of Buhl city planning and hired John Hayes and Paul S. A. Bickel to layout the town and oversee initial construction of Buhl’s first major building, a hotel.

The town of Buhl was platted in 1905 but much to the dismay of some early residents, the town was laid out in the same diagonal design as the city of Twin Falls. Whereas normally a town is laid out in a north-south, east-west direction for ease of finding places, the Buhl town site was arranged to get the most benefit from the sun.

It was decided by members of the Twin Falls Land and Water Company that the town should be named after Frank H. Buhl because of his decision to donate land for the initial town site. Mr. Buhl continued to be a major supporter for the fledgling town throughout his life, with major contributions to the construction of the high school, the land it was built on, and Faris Field.

Today Buhl remains primarily an agricultural community with its roots deep in history and the pride of its residents. Most of the downtown buildings are over 50 years old; stand testament to the town’s rich past. A planned 2 million dollar “Downtown Revitalization Project” to replace streets, sidewalks, gutter systems, and street lights highlights this towns continuing look to the future while preserving its heritage.

Recreational opportunities abound in Buhl and the surrounding areas. East of Buhl is the Shoshone Falls, Herrett Center for Arts and Science and the scenic Snake River Valley. West of Buhl you will find Thousand Springs, Banbury’s Hot Springs, Salmon Falls Canyon, Miracle Hot Springs Nature Conservancy, Balanced Rock, Hageman Fossil Beds, Malad Park and Snake River Boat Tours. North of Buhl are the Clear Lakes which were named by Field & Stream as the 2nd best pay-to-fish lake in the Northwest. Riding trails are also abundant along the Snake River. Buhl is also centrally located for fantastic hunting opportunities which include duck, geese, pheasant, antelope, deer and elk.

Buhl is just south of the historic Oregon Trail and its small-town life reflects the heart of our country in the early 1900’s. The people here are friendly, the stores cater to casual shoppers and the town itself is central to a number of the recreational opportunities offered by the Magic Valley. 
 

 
Shoshone Falls
Often called the “Niagara of the West”, these are the most well known falls in Idaho, and the most powerful falls in the Northwest. At 212 feet, the falls are actually higher than Niagara Falls. They are best viewed during the spring, when water flows are high covering the cliff face in roaring torrents of water. Little more than a trickle of the falls might can be seen when the flows are low, as they are "controlled" by the Milner Dam and the small dam immediately above the falls which turns them "off" during the agricultural season by diverting the water to the farmlands. A prime example of man working with nature to adapt to the environment; not a site to be missed! 

 
 
Hot Springs
Bandury and Miracle Hot springs are both located just west of Buhl. Banbury Hot Springs along the Snake River offers an outdoor pool with a slide and diving board along with a picnic area and a boat ramp. Miracle Hot springs offers two outdoor swimming pools with general admission, and nineteen private soaking pools that may be reserved for an additional hourly fee. All pools have continuously flowing natural hot water. Continuously flowing fresh water is kept cool in the summer and warm in the winter to provide a perfect temperature to exercise and play. Pools are drained and cleaning nightly; there are 11 RV sites and 5 tent sites are on property. A perfect getaway close at hand! 

 

Welcome to Butte, Montana
Butte is a city in Montana and the county seat of Silver Bow County. Butte began it's history as a mining town, from camp to boomtown and then into a fine city grounded in historic preservation and environmental consciousness. Despite the dominance of the Anaconda Company, Butte has never been a "company town"; prides itself on it's architectural diversity and a heiritate of rough-and-tumble individualism that the West is known for. 
 
 
Rich History
Butte was Montana's largest city until 1960, and in it's heyday in the late 19th century held it's claim as one of the largest and most notorious copper boomtowns in America.From 1880 through 2005, the mines of the Butte district have produced more than 9.6 million metric tons of copper, and tons of other precious metals including over 2 million ounces of gold. It is from this rugged pioneering history that the residents of Butte draw on for their wealth in spirit. The uptown area of Butte has in recent years gone through a revitalization, breathing new life into the old mining history of the town; is part of the largest National Historic Landmark Disctrict in the United States with nearly 6,000 contributing properties. 
 
 
Festivals and Events
Butte is also home to many festivals and events throughout the year including the annual celebration of Butte's Irish heritage as part of the annual St. Patrick's Day festivities, a tribute to daredevils during the Knievel Days, as well as the largest 4th of July fireworks display in the state! If you are visiting Butte a great way to see the area and learn more about it's history is on the Trolley. In about 2 hours, you'll see where characters, famous folks, miners, and scoundrels lived and worked. Plus, you'll hear how they made Butte the lively urban center it was. 

 

Gateway to the Treasure Valley
Caldwell is the western gateway to the Treasure Valley and seat of Idaho’s second largest county, Canyon County. Just 25 miles west of Boise, Caldwell is situated on the Boise River in one of the most productive agricultural regions in the country. Wine grapes are among the agricultural products found here. Several leading wineries are located near Caldwell. 
 
 
Historical Caldwell
Established as a camp for construction employees of the Oregon Short Line Railroad, the town was originally called Hamburg after a local blacksmith. It was later named after C.A. Caldwell, president of the Idaho and Oregon Land Improvement Company, a development company eager to lure settlers to the area. Today’s visitors can get a taste of that history and a view of some lovely old homes on a walking tour developed by an active historical association. 
 
 
Change in Caldwell
Caldwell terms itself a city on the move, and it is definitely that! Growth, change and contrasts are the hallmarks of this community of 30,000. The city is currently revitalizing its downtown, starting with developing a pedestrian area surrounding Indian Creek, a stream that runs through the heart of town. A new YMCA is being built and plans are under way to upgrade the airport and the county fairgrounds, and to restore the train depot. 

 

Location
Nestled in the majestic central Idaho Mountains, in scenic Long Valley, Lake Cascade is a year-round playground for outdoor enthusiasts. Just a ninety-minute drive from Boise, Idaho’s fourth largest lake is well known for fishing and boating in summer and for ice fishing in the winter. Prevailing winds make it especially well suited to sailing and windsurfing. During winter, snowmobilers enjoy approximately 800 miles of groomed trails. There are also 27 kilometers of Nordic ski trails. A challenging nine hole golf course sits on the lake shore. 
 
 
Life and Recreation
Cascade, Idaho, a small community with a population of 977, sits at the southern end of Lake Cascade. Cascade is the gateway to Idaho’s Frank Church Wilderness Area, as well as a center for hunting, camping, hiking, backpacking, horseback riding, and rafting. 
 
 
Tamarack Resort
The recent opening of Tamarack Resort, the first golf, ski and lake resort to be fully permitted in the United States in more than twenty years, bodes change for both communities. The resort, on the northwest shore of Lake Cascade, planned over $52 million in worth of construction projects in 2004 to build chalets and cottages and ready the resort for alpine skiing operations in the winter of 2004-2005, to complete the golf course scheduled to open in 2005, and to develop new hiking and mountain biking trails. The construction was expected to create 450 jobs. 

 

Welcome to McCall
McCall is the premier community in idyllic Long Valley, a fifty-mile long mix of pastureland and forest surrounded by snow-capped peaks. At an elevation of 5025 feet, McCall sits at the southern end of Payette Lake. McCall has just over 2,000 residents. 
 
 
Recreation
Once a sawmill town, McCall is now a world-class, year-round resort community with a down-home feel. The Payette Lake offers every kind of water sport imaginable in summer, and the Payette National Forest provides more than 21,100 miles of trails, 2,500 miles of roads, 15,000 miles of streams and rivers and 30 campgrounds. Hiking, rafting, rock climbing, fishing, hunting, bird and wildlife watching are all activities enjoyed in and near McCall. McCall is also home to the only 27-hole golf course in the region plus several private golf courses. You’ll also find art galleries and plenty of restaurants, from home-style to elegant. 
 
 
Brundage Ski Resort
In winter, Brundage Mountain Ski Resort, ten miles north of McCall, provides excellent powder skiing, snowboarding and cross-country skiing with a family focus: day care for children 6 week to 8 years of age and lessons for children from 4 to 10 years old. Cross-country skiers will find more miles of groomed trails in Ponderosa Park on the edge of Payette Lake. 

 

Coeur d’Alene
Coeur d’Alene, the Lake City, is the heart of the Panhandle—the hub of the varied activities and diverse communities that make up North Idaho. With a population of 37,262 (2003), Coeur d’Alene, the region’s largest city, is only thirty minutes from Spokane, Washington. 

Those seeking water-related sports, a welcoming four-season lifestyle and many of the benefits of much larger communities have found what they’re seeking in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho’s “Lake City.” Coeur d’Alene perches at the north end of Lake Coeur d’Alene. 

 
 

Termed one of the world’s most beautiful lakes by the Encyclopedia Britannica, Lake Coeur d’Alene stretches 23 miles to the south. It is Idaho’s largest lake. With nearly 135 miles of shoreline, Lake Coeur d’Alene is home to a large variety of fish, most notable Chinook salmon and cutthroat trout. Other species include trout, crappie, perch, large-mouth bass, bullheads, blue gills, sunfish, channel catfish, northern pike and tiger muskies. 

Not just a haven for fishermen, the lake is a site for a variety of water activities, including water skiing, windsurfing, jet skiing, parasailing, boat cruises, seaplane rides and more. Sea kayak on the lake or find whitewater rafting adventures within two hours of town. 


 
 

In the past steamboats plied the lake and its tributary rivers, and photos of those old river cruisers can be seen in a visit to the Museum of North Idaho.

Coeur d’Alene was originally established as Fort Sherman at the headwaters of the Spokane River. That pioneer village became the city of Coeur d’Alene, and eventually the Kootenai County seat. Remains of the fort can now be seen on the grounds of the North Idaho College. 

 

History
Early settlers came to this part of the valley in 1886. Many more came in 1887 and 1888 and settled the eastern slope of the Goldfork Area. The valley floor and west of the river weren't settled until 1900-1904. All supplies were brought in from Boise, Emmett, Weiser and Salubria Valleys by six-horse freight teams. A trip up from Boise to Roseberry with team and wagon took a week, longer in bad weather. Roseberry became a thriving town and was the largest town in the valley until the railroad came in 1914 to the newly founded town of Donnelly. The town was named after a Mr. Donnelly who was a prominent railroad man at the time. 
 
 
Superbly Located
Located about 100 miles north of Boise, on the beautiful Northern end of Lake Cascade Donnelly is North Idaho’s newest hotspot. Nestled between mountains to the East and West this area is prime for some of the best deer and elk hunting in the state, as well as excellent fishing for Rainbow Trout, Coho Salmon and Perch. Cozy, quiet little towns dot the entire valley floor offering a taste of a more simple life; offering unique shopping and dining experiences. 
 
 
Gateway to Tamarack
Gateway to world known Tamarack resort, Donnelly is just 20 minutes from first class skiing, the new Robert Trent Jones golf course, and year round recreation. At an elevation of nearly 5,000 feet Donnelly enjoys average temperatures in summer of about 75 degrees, making for the perfect weather to BBQ, water ski, fish or take in the natural scenery on a Huckleberry picking adventure. The beautiful uncrowded waters of Lake Cascade make for great sailing as well. 

 

Welcome to Eagle
Eagle is located 10 miles west of downtown Boise in Ada County, between the Boise River and the Boise foothills. From its roots as a small farming community in the late 1800s, Eagle grew slowly to a community of 2,500 in 1990. By 2003, the population was estimated at 14,000! 

In response to this growth, the city of Eagle has acknowledged that its primary function is to serve as a bedroom community to Boise and other Treasure Valley employment centers, and is working to assure that it is a desirable place to live and raise a family. 

 
 
Rural and Urban Living
Some Eagle residents have coined the term “rurban” to characterize their city as a community maintaining its rural charm in the increasingly urban setting of Ada County. They might be surprised to learn how closely that fits the vision of the early 20th century developers of the Interurban streetcar line. By providing public transportation to Ustick, Meridian, Star, Middleton, Caldwell, Nampa, and Eagle, they hoped to provide residents a taste of country life with easy access to urban work centers. 
 
 
Downtown Eagle
The streetcar line is no more, but the city of Eagle maintains its rural appeal, with plenty of open space, a Western architectural theme, tree-lined streets, and plenty of parks. In addition to four existing and two planned parks, Eagle Island State Park at the city’s western edge provides another 500 acres of riding trails and recreational opportunities. 

 

Welcome to Emmett
Drive into the “valley of plenty,” via Highway 16’s Freeze-out Hill and you’ll see orchards and fields stretched out before stark foothills where a century ago outlaws found refuge. Head on into Emmett and you’ll soon feel that legendary small-town serenity. New housing developments are nearly hidden in the rolling hills surrounding town. 
 
 
Local Life
From the tree-shaded park across from the railroad depot to the drive-in café where neighbors meet over a flavored soda, Emmett is a town linked to its past but poised for the future. Since the late 1800’s, the town has been known for its abundant cherry, apple, peach and apricot orchards, and Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout the summer, you can find fruit, produce and other local products in the Farmers Market. This June marks the 70th year of the annual Cherry Festival, an event that culminates in a fun run and a parade that brings as many as 50,000 people to this community of 6,000. 
 
 
Emmett History
The town began as the site of a ferry across the Payette River. Its first postmaster named the post office Emmettville, in honor of his son. In 1900 Emmettville incorporated, its name cropped to Emmett. 

 

Welcome to Fruitland,Idaho
”The Big Apple of Idaho”! No, it’s not a bustling metropolis - it’s Fruitland! A small community of just over 4,000, the original town site was 160 acres mostly planted with apple and prune orchards that give the city its name. Although Fruitland holds proudly to its agricultural heritage it has grown to include a diversity of new business and light industry. 
 
 
Events and Education
Payette County Fair 
Nearby New Plymouth is home to the annual Payette County Fair, held at the Payette County Fairgrounds. There’s a little something for everyone at the fair including 4-H and FFA shows, Free Music, Raffles, Games, Contest, Demonstrations, and of course lots of great food to enjoy while you are there. The fair is a great way to bring the community and surrounding towns together for a fun time for all ages. 

Spring Fair and Parade 
Usually held the second weekend of May each year, the fair features livestock, arts, foods and crafts from around the area. The local Lions Club holds a chicken barbecue in the school parking lot, which has been a great success in the past. Fruitland Family Fun Day is also held each September in the community park. Don’t miss this wonderful chance to mingle with the locals and get a little taste of what a sweet community Fruitland truly is! 

Christmas in the Park 
Held each December in the community park, a true central gathering spot for the city, Christmas in the park brings family and friends together in the spirit of the holidays. Share in songs, games, friends, and fun before the New Year arrives! 

Treasure Valley Community College 
Treasure Valley Community College was founded in the fall of 1962 as part of the Oregon Community College system. Classes were originally conducted at Ontario High School during the late afternoon and evening hours. 

Beginning with a solitary building, the college moved to its present location in Ontario, Oregon during the fall of 1965. Several other buildings were added during the next year and today the campus houses 13 major buildings. 
Treasure Valley Community College has grown from an enrollment of several hundred students, to one of several thousand annually. Currently, more than 12,000 students attend classes each year, either on a full-time or part-time basis. Treasure Valley Community College is a great resource for anyone looking to expand their knowledge base, and only a stones throw from Fruitland. 

 
 
RECREATION - GOLF
Ontario Golf Club 
The 18-hole "Ontario" course at the Ontario Golf Club in Ontario, Oregon features 6,795 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 72. The course rating is 70.4 and it has a slope rating of 111. Designed by Bob E. Baldock, the Ontario golf course opened in 1964. Mark Copley manages the course as the Superintendent. 

Country View Golf Course 
The 9-hole "Country View" course at the Country View Golf Course in Ontario, Oregon features 5,660 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 71. The course rating is 66.4 and it has a slope rating of 104. Designed by Scott McKinney, the Country View golf course opened in 1999. Scott McKinney manages the course as the Owner/Manager/Superintendent. 

Scotch Pines Golf Course 
Scotch Pines is an 18-hole, par 72 course built in 1961. Artfully carved from the natural terrain of the Idaho countryside, Scotch Pines offers blue grass and rye fairways and bent grass greens. This beautiful course offers all the amenities you have come to expect from a great course, including it’s own restaurant where you can refuel after a long days play. 

Rolling Hills Golf Course 
Rolling Hills Golf Course in Weiser features a 9 hole course with 3,048 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 36 and a driving range. The course rating is 36.5 and it has a slope rating of 115. Originally designed by Frank James/Conrad Kranzler, the Rolling Hills golf course opened in 2001. Donna Walker manages the course as the General Manager. 

 

Garden Valley
Just an hour north of Boise, Garden Valley lies in a valley formed by the confluence of the South and Middle Forks of the Payette River. Here you’ll find the leisurely pace and friendliness of a small mountain town, and some of southwestern Idaho’s most prestigious housing subdivisions. 
 
 
Scenic Area
The tiny town of Crouch is part of Garden Valley, and its old buildings retain the rustic flavor of the old West. The community is on the Wildlife Canyon Scenic Byway, eight miles east of Highway 55. Mountain peaks soar to 7000 feet above the town and below it stretch meadows bisected by the meandering South Fork of the Payette River. Those meadows provide winter range to large herds of elk and deer and host numerous migratory birds such as Canadian geese and eagle, osprey, heron and hawks. 
 
 
Recreation
The Payette River system offers whitewater classifications from I to IV. Outfitters offer half-day, full day and overnight trips spring through autumn. 

 

Welcome to Gooding, Idaho!
The town of Gooding was established in 1907 on 160 acres of land owned by Frank R. Gooding, a former Governor and Senator in Idaho. Gooding combines all of the conveniences of a larger city with friendly atmosphere of a small western community. The population growth has been steady rather than spectacular, and Gooding County has kept true to the resources that gave it birth. The Big and Little Wood Rivers remain the basis for a richly irrigated agriculture and a thriving livestock industry.

Gooding’s mild climate compares favorably with the some of the extremes found in other parts of the state. With a four season environment, the weather features a definitive spring, summer, fall and winter. The average high temperature of 76 degrees, average low temperature of 28 degrees and average precipitation of 8.93 inches.

Golfing, skiing, boating, hunting, camping, bowling, horseshoes and summer city recreation programs are all part of the local year round scene. Softball diamonds, indoor swimming pool, 3 city parks and tennis courts are all close to the downtown area. Major employers in the area include Glanbia Foods, Gooding County Memorial Hospital, The Walker Center, Idaho State School for the Deaf and Blind, Gooding Rehabilitation and Living Center, amongst others. 
 

 
Gooding Fairgrounds
The Gooding County Fairgrounds are host to a number of events and activities. NCHA Cow Cutting, Pepsi Challenge Bull Riding, Team Sortings, Auctions and Expos, Idaho State Horse Show, American Crown Circus, and the Basque Picnic are just a few of the events held at the grounds. From the early days of the Gooding County Fair and Rodeo people from all over the state come year after year to renew friendships, enjoy the food, and watch the featured entertainment. The Gooding County Fair and Rodeo is an event that holds something for every member of the family of the family to enjoy! 
 
 
Basque Association Picnic
The Gooding Basque Association Picnic is held the 3rd Sunday of July at the Gooding County Fairgrounds. Participants can look forward to enjoying the fine company and delicacies of the Basque culture. Rich with cultural dancing, weight carrying and lifting contests, with categories for men, women and children. The new Basque cultural center opened January 18, 2003 where they serve a traditional dinner the first Friday of every month. The goals of the Basque association are to promote the Basque cultural through food, dance, language and a variety of other activities. 

 

Welcome to Hagerman, Idaho
The City of Hagerman, which gives the Hagerman valley its name, was originally the site of a stagecoach stop, on the Overland Trail Route, along the Oregon Trail. Remains of this historic pioneer route can still be seen along the west side of the Snake River. Hagerman was officially established in 1892 when Stanley Hageman and Jack Hess opened a combination Post Office/General Store. The town was actually named for Stanley Hageman but a misspelling in the central post office registry changed its official name to Hagerman. 

Today, the valley is the largest producer of commercial trout in the world. The mild climate and abundance of year round open water make the valley a preferred stop-off for migrating waterfowl. So much open water also provides numerous water sport opportunities, making the Hagerman Valley a tourist's wonderland and a sportsman's dream. The area is also rapidly becoming known as an ideal retirement spot because of its climate, beautiful scenery, diverse recreational opportunities and comfortable small town atmosphere. 

 
 
Hagerman Fossil Bed
During the Pliocene Epoch, this area was an ancient lake. The layers of sediment have preserved the world's richest known fossil deposits from that age. Research began in the late 1920's and continues today. Partial skeletons of over 200 "Hagerman Horses" (related to the modern zebra) were recovered here by the Smithsonian Institution, various universities and the National Park Service. Located just west of Twin Falls the monument has a visitor center in Hagerman and the site offers visitors hiking, horse and mountain bike trails as well as an overlook to view Oregon Trail wagon ruts. 
 
 
Thousand Springs Preserve
The Nature Conservancy's Thousand Springs Preserve, located a few miles south of the City of Hagerman, borders the Snake River for about 2½ miles. Its 400 acres form a meandering ribbon of quiet bottomlands and spring-fed creeks edged by magnificent basalt cliffs and sparkling cascades of crystal clear water. Bird-watch and enjoy the unique plant life while you hike the nature trails. Put your canoe in at the Idaho Power plant park adjacent to the preserve and explore miles of river. 

 


Located on the Snake River at the western edge of the Rocky Mountains Idaho Falls is one of the fastest growing cities in Eastern Idaho. It features all the amenities and comforts of larger cities but still retains the spirit and warmth of a all American small town. 
 
 
HISTORY
From it's very beginning, business has played a large role in the life and growth of Idaho Falls as in 1904 the Idaho Falls Commercial Club was founded as one of the very first busines organizations in the area. Today Idaho Falls continues to be a major business area for the Eastern side of the Gem State for private business as well as for government business like the Idaho National Laboratory that was established in 1949. 

In May 2006, Inc. magazine ranked Idaho Falls eighth on its list of "Hottest Small Cities" in the U.S. based on the region's job growth rate over the prior 10 years. Idaho Falls was also listed #2 on MSN Real Estate's list of top ten best smaller cities in America, in terms of job prospects, quality of life and cost of living. 
 
 
CULTURE
In addition to business,Idaho Falls has established itself as a regional cultural destination. The Willard Art Center, The Colonial Theatre and Civic Auditorium are home to year-round, diverse musical concerts, plays, and events. Other community events, such as the Melaleuca Freedom Celebration, the Roaring Youth Jam, and the Farmers' Market, among others are held along the cities popular Greenbelt area. 

The Museum of Idaho is a wonderful attraction which showcases local artifacts and history, as well as bringing in major traveling exhibits such as dinosaur bones, Gutenberg Bibles, Titanic remnants, and more. 

Despite struggles early on Downtown Idaho Falls has been revitalized in recent years due to the efforts of local business owners, the City of Idaho Falls, and other organizations such as the Downtown Development Corporation and the Idaho Falls Chamber of Commerce. Today it features a wide variety of locally owned shops, restaurants, venues, and galleries 

Idaho Falls also attracts many tourists visiting nearby Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, Jackson Hole, and the world-class fishing on the Snake River. Due to its proximity to so many outdoor destinations, Idaho Falls was recently named to National Geographic's list of "100 Best Adventure Towns". 

 

Beautiful Treasure Valley
Dreaming of a place where incredible skiing is just minutes away?

Where you're a short drive from wilderness where the deer and the antelope really do play? (Not to mention elk, moose, bighorn sheep and river otters.)

Where you can see opera or live theater without searching for parking or fighting traffic? 

Stop dreaming and pack your bags for a virtual visit to the Treasure Valley! 

No longer just for the outdoor lover, southwest Idaho has become a haven for those seeking a better life. With mountains at your front door and rivers pulsing through the heart of vibrant communities, the Treasure Valley has everything you're looking for. 

 

 
Terrain
The Treasure Valley spans the Snake River plain from Mountain Home, Idaho, in the east to Ontario, Oregon at the west. Its varied terrain includes high deserts, mountains, forests, lush farmland and river valleys. Within it you'll find tiny communities that have changed little in the last hundred years and the vibrant capital city of Idaho, Boise, a growing, thriving commercial and business center that retains the charm of a small town. 
 
 
Boise History
Boise's trees in the high desert setting inspired French Canadian fur trappers to name the river and valley after them (Boise translates to wooded in English). The Boise valley remained merely a corridor through which emigrants passed until gold was discovered in 1862. Enterprising developers established the town to supply the many nearby mining camps, and to serve as a governmental center. A fort was built in 1863, and in 1864 Boise was made the territorial capital. Railroads arrived in the 1880's, an irrigation system in the early 1900's, and the rest is history. 

 

Welcome to Jerome, Idaho
Located in south-central Idaho, the city of Jerome is surrounded by an efflorescing agricultural countryside, with beautiful mountains to the north and the meandering Snake River Canyon to the South. 
The county seat of Jerome County, Jerome was established in 1907 by the Kuhn Brothers, as part of the North Side Twin Falls Canal Company. It takes its name from Jerome Hill, one of the investors in the project, and a brother-in-law of W.S. Kuhn. The city of Jerome became a municipal corporation on March 24, 1919. 
Today the city of Jerome is the economic center of Jerome County. Farming and Agricultural related industries still dominate the economy of Jerome, but the city is broadening its economic base in the service sector, as well as the manufacturing and retail trades. 
Jerome has a rich architectural heritage, which is evident in the city's downtown, handsome homes, and numerous lava rock structures. With a relatively compact city center, a diversifying economy, and attractive neighborhoods Jerome is in an advantageous position for growth in the coming years. 

 
 
Jerome Cheese Company
A Division of Davisco Foods International, Inc. the Jerome Cheese Company manufactures and distributes Magic Valley Maid Fine Dairy Products. The Jerome Cheese Company is a proud part of its local community providing jobs for thousands of area residents. Daily the Jerome Cheese Company receives 50+ truckloads of raw milk, ships 9+ truckloads of cheese to various Kraft plants, ships 5+ truckloads of whey powder all over U.S. and overseas, produces over 400,000 gallons of useable water, and 4,000,000 lbs. of milk is condensed and processed into 390,000 lbs. of cheese. That’s a lot of cheese! 
 
 
Jerome Historical Museum
Established in 1981, the Jerome Historical Museum features displays that tell the story of the development of the North Side Irrigation project, one of the most successful Carey Irrigation Act projects in the nation, and the towns and its people. A display of materials from the Minidoka Relocation Center at Hunt is also featured. A large research library is available that includes over one hundred bound volumes of newspapers and a large collection of detailed indexes.

 

Welcome to Kamiah, Idaho
Kamiah, Idaho is nestled on the beautiful banks of the Clearwater River, surrounded by scenic foothills. Heritage meets the modern day world as the forward looking residents of this quaint town focus on the future without losing site of the past. 
Before history was recorded in this part of the west, Kamiah was the winter home of the Nez Perce Indians. It was here they came to fish for steelhead, a mainstay in their diet, and to manufacture "Kamia" ropes, hence the name Kamiah, meaning the place of "many rope litters". 

Lewis and Clark camped here for several weeks during the early spring of 1806 waiting for the snow to melt before they could continue their journey east. The valley is rich in the heritage and legends of the Nez Perce and it is here, among the ancestors of the present day Nez Perce, that the Appaloosa horse was first bred, primarily as a war animal. 
Today the town is moving fast towards the future, and this is reflected in the restoration of the main business district to a Western/Victorian style, an up-to-date school system, modern sanitation facilities and water filtration plant, efficient fire and police departments, a modern medical clinic with an outstanding emergency medical unit. Come visit the past in a place where the future is happening today – Kamiah! 

 
 
Heart of the Monster
It may sound intimidating at first but it is from this place that the Nez Perce tribe first began – or so the legend tells. The rock formation that is the center of this site represents the heart of a monster, which according to legend is the source from which the Nez Perce sprang. 
The formation sits two miles upstream from a bridge across the Clearwater River in Kamiah, Idaho. In ancient times this site was a major prehistoric and historic Nez Perce crossing point of the Clearwater River. You will learn the role of the legend in Nez Perce culture as you view exhibits and listen to audio programs at an interpretive shelter near the formation. 
The geologic feature at the center of the creation story by which Coyote slew a monster, and called into existence The People – “Nimiipuu”. This Nez Perce National Historic Park site is located near Kamiah on US Highway 12, enroute to Kooskia. 

 
 
Hunting and Fishing

Kamiah is just a stones throw from the great untamed wilds of Idaho where big game hunting is at its best. The nation's largest elk herd is located not far from here, and deer, bear, mountain lion, pheasant and grouse are plentiful. Idaho Fish and Game Department allows hunters to draw lots for special moose and mountain goat hunts. 

Kamiah is a hotbed for the avid fisherman! The massive steelhead trout, some measuring up to 45 inches in length, and the chinook salmon travel up the Clearwater river to spawn. There are both fall and spring seasons for these beauties, with whitefishing in the winter, and trout and bass fishing during the summer. Well-stocked creeks and mountain lakes an hour or two hike away; the Clearwater and its tributaries, make for some of the finest fishing in the country. 

 


People are discovering that the western gateway city to North Idaho is much more than that. In fact, Post Falls, Idaho’s River City, lays claim to being the fastest growing community in Idaho. It has grown from 7,350 residents in 1990 to over 30,123 today. 

Only 25 minutes from downtown Spokane, Washington, and ten minutes from downtown Coeur d’Alene, this thriving community has become a favorite for corporate relocation. Newcomers like Buck Knives, a premier manufacturer of hunting and fishing knives, Harper’s, a major furniture manufacturer, and the Center for Advanced Microelectronics and Biomolecular Research at the University of Idaho Research Park are bringing diverse jobs and people to town. 

 
 

Like many North Idaho communities, Post Falls provides a refreshing mix of commercial and recreational opportunities. The Spokane River winds right through town, roaring over falls at Falls Park. Q’emiln Riverside Park offers swimming, picnicking and a boat launch, and not far away, some of the region’s best rock climbing. Or take a walk up to Treaty Rock, in the heart of town, where Frederick Post signed a treaty with the local Coeur d’Alene tribal leader Seltice, and built his sawmill and town. Not far away are long scenic hiking trails and emerging popular white water kayak training locations. 
 
 

For more leisurely strolling, take advantage of shopping at the Post Falls Prime Outlets and Post Falls Factory Stores off I-90, or head downtown to see the results of exciting downtown revitalization projects. You won’t go hungry. Restaurants of all varieties abound in this community. 

 

Kuna History
Kuna (pronounced as quna, not as in “tuna”) was named with the help of an Indian language dictionary. It was believed to be the Shoshone word for “snow;” others say it means “the end,” or “the end of the trail.” With its strong agricultural roots, a one hundred-year tradition of successful dairy and beef cattle operations, and a growing and young population, “the end” is definitely a misnomer for this Ada County community. 
 
 
Kuna Farming
About eighteen miles southwest of Boise, Kuna lies between fertile irrigated lands and scenic rangelands. Crops grown successfully in the Kuna area include corn, alfalfa, beans, sugar beets, grains, seeds, and mint. It is also home to numerous horse breeders. 
 
 
City to the Birds
Kuna is the Gateway City to the Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, which contains the densest nesting population of raptors in the world. 

 

Great Location
Nestled between Moscow Mountain and the rolling hills of the Palouse, Moscow is located in beautiful northern Idaho. Small-town friendliness meets a great location for higher education, Moscow being home to the University of Idaho, with Washington State University just across the state line. 
 
 
Moscow History
After settlers arrived in 1871, the town became know as "Paradise Valley". In 1877, Samuel Neff filed for a postal permit under the name of Moscow because the area reminded him of his hometown of Moscow, Pennsylvania – not Moscow, Russia as some may be likely to presume! 

In 1875, the city's first store was opened on what is now Main Street. Like many western towns Moscow grew with the arrival of the railroad, in 1885. The town became incorporated two years later and was chosen as the site for a land-grant institution, the University of Idaho as Idaho achieved statehood in 1890. 
 
 
The Outdoors
The current Moscow is a community of about 22,000 people and is the personification of "small-town" friendliness. What makes Moscow a gem is that in addition to its small-town charm, this college town also provides a rich assortment of cultural and recreational activities. A mild climate, clean air, a hub for higher education, Moscow attracts a diverse group of residents and visitors. We invite you to visit the “Palouse” and experience a true undiscovered paradise! 

Not only a center for learning, Moscow is a great place for those who love the outdoors as well. Camping, mountain biking, snowmobiling, fishing and skiing abound, with some of the best big game and upland game hunting in the world located nearby. Moscow is also the "Heart of the Arts"-- with the annual Jazz Festival, live music on the town, the Rendezvous in the Park, and summer theatre. 

 

City Location
Located where the Snake and Clearwater Rivers meet, sister city to Clarkston in Washington, Lewiston, Idaho is rich with cultural and natural resources sure to please the outdoor enthusiast and historical adventurer alike. 
 
 
Lewiston History
A city which has now grown to a population of 31,028, when Lewis and Clark first visited these lands made home by the Nez Perce tribe they called it "paradise". In that respect not much has changed since those early days as Lewiston and its surrounding area still holds true to its wondrous beginnings. Warm coastal air pours through river valleys providing an ideal climate for wildlife and residents both. The summers stay mild, usually in the low 90’s and the winter temperatures in the 40’s are rarely harsh, making a great environment for many activities year round. 

Founded in 1860, named for Meriwether Lewis of the famed Lewis and Clark expedition, Lewiston is Idaho’s only seaport as well as its oldest city. In 1863 Lewiston was made the state capital of Idaho, a title which it retained for only a few years until the capital was moved to where it resides today in Boise. 

 
 
Lewis & Clark College
Lewiston is also home to the Lewis-Clark State College. Originally established in 1893 under the name Lewis-Clark State Normal School as a teacher training institution the college today provides professional, arts, and science baccalaureate degree programs and excellent vocational and technical programs as well. 

 

About the Magic Valley
The Magic Valley is located in south-central Idaho and consists of Blaine, Camas, Cassia, Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, Minidoka, and Twin Falls Counties. The rich Snake River plain feeds this heavily agriculture focused region. This area got it's name due to the construction of the Milner and Minidoka Dams and a series of irrigation systems built during the first part of the 20th century which "magically transformed" what had previously been a very dry desert environment. 
 
 
Events and Activities
There are a number of cultural and entertainment events to by found at many of the local county fairs in the region during late Summer. Sun Valley also offers several attractions throughout the year; Hagerman hosts one of the largest blues festivals in the state. Outdoor enthusiasts won't have to look far to find something to keep them busy either - there are great opportunities for camping, hunting, and fishing all throughout the valley. 
 
 
Jerome Idaho
Located in south-central Idaho, the city of Jerome is surrounded by an efflorescing agricultural countryside, with beautiful mountains to the north and the meandering Snake River Canyon to the South. 

The city of Jerome is the economic center of Jerome County. Farming and Agricultural related industries still dominate the economy of Jerome, but the city is broadening its economic base in the service sector, as well as the manufacturing and retail trades. 

Jerome has a rich architectural heritage, which is evident in the city's downtown, handsome homes, and numerous lava rock structures. With a relatively compact city center, a diversifying economy, and attractive neighborhoods Jerome is in an advantageous position for growth in the coming years. 

 

Meridian
Another of Southwest Idaho’s rapidly growing communities, Meridian is located just 10 miles west of Boise, immediately accessible from Interstate 84. The city’s 2014 estimated population was 75,092. 
 
 
Meridian History
Like many Idaho towns, Meridian owes its existence to the development of an irrigation system. Its earliest settlers lived along Five Mile Creek, where water was available most of the year. The first school opened in 1885, and a post office opened along the rail line from Boise to Nampa soon after. It was named Hunter. When the Settlers Ditch brought irrigation water in 1892, the population grew. In 1893, an Order of Odd Fellows Lodge was established and chose the name Meridian, because the surveyor’s meridian passes through the town. Lodge members surveyed the town site and named it Meridian after the lodge. 
 
 
Industry
Farmers planted large fruit orchards, establishing an industry that thrived through the 1940s. The first creamery was built in 1897 and when other dairying related businesses followed, the town became known as a dairy center for the state. 

Meridian still celebrates its roots in the dairy industry, with Meridian Dairy Days, held each June. Other fun festivities include the Chili Cook-off in January and the Scarecrow Festival in October. 

 

Location
Located in Canyon County, Idaho Middleton is a quiet small town of around 6,000 people. In it's original location Middleton was one of the oldest original settlements in the area and the oldest settlement in Canyon County. It got it's name due to be located about mid-way between Boise and an old ferry crossing on the Snake River. In 1872 the Boise River caused a massive flood which isolated the town on it's own island and eventually caused the town to be moved to where it is located now. 

Near the Idaho/Oregon border Middleton is Westernly located in Idaho, making it ideal for those looking to escape the busy pace of city life, or for those who have family in Oregon or North Idaho. There are also a number of activites and things to do including a number of great parks and natural areas like Jump Creek and the Kuna Caves. 

 
 
Outdoors
Outdoors 
Lake Owyhee State Park is also just a short drive West and features some of the best opportunties for boating and water sports in the area. 

The Owyhee Reservoir is a 53-mile-long lake, filling a narrow, deep canyon brimming with colorful volcanic rock formations. The stunning desert canyone scenery is rugged and beautiful with Some of the unique geology being visible only by boat. This oasis is also a favorite spot for anglers as well, especially for those seeking largemouth bass and black crappie. 

 
 
Other Fun
The Canyon County Fair is a big event for the entire county every Summer and features free concerts, carnival rides, exhibits, and of course delicious foods. 

Go jump out of a perfectly good plane! Believe it or not the wide open areas between towns makes for some of the best drop zones in the state! There are several sky-diving companies surrounding Middleton that are more than glad to take you up for the high altitude thrills you've been looking for! 

 

History
Nestled between Moscow Mountain and the rolling hills of the Palouse, Moscow is located in beautiful northern Idaho. Small-town friendliness meets a great location for higher education, Moscow being home to the University of Idaho, with Washington State University just across the state line.

After settlers arrived in 1871, the town became know as "Paradise Valley". In 1877, Samuel Neff filed for a postal permit under the name of Moscow because the area reminded him of his hometown of Moscow, Pennsylvania – not Moscow, Russia as some may be likely to presume!

In 1875, the city's first store was opened on what is now Main Street. Like many western towns Moscow grew with the arrival of the railroad, in 1885. The town became incorporated two years later and was chosen as the site for a land-grant institution, the University of Idaho as Idaho achieved statehood in 1890. 

 

 
Moscow Today
The current Moscow is a community of about 22,000 people and is the personification of "small-town" friendliness. What makes Moscow a gem is that in addition to its small-town charm, this college town also provides a rich assortment of cultural and recreational activities. A mild climate, clean air, a hub for higher education, Moscow attracts a diverse group of residents and visitors. We invite you to visit the “Palouse” and experience a true undiscovered paradise! 

Not only a center for learning, Moscow is a great place for those who love the outdoors as well. Camping, mountain biking, snowmobiling, fishing and skiing abound, with some of the best big game and upland game hunting in the world located nearby. Moscow is also the "Heart of the Arts"-- with the annual Jazz Festival, live music on the town, the Rendezvous in the Park, and summer theatre. 

 
 
Camping, Fishing and More
Opportunities for camping, fishing and more abound right at hand in Moscow! “The Palouse” is a region covering approximately 16,000 square kilometers of land in northwestern Idaho, southeastern Washington and eastern Oregon. The Palouse region encompasses the rolling, fertile hills of the Palouse prairie, as well as the more southerly Camas Prairie and the forested hills and canyon lands of the area’s rivers. An area rich for nature experiences!

Moose Creek and Spring Valley Reservoirs are favorite fishing holes for local residents. Located just east of Moscow these small reservoirs are stocked with trout and bass. To preserve the environment, boats with electric motors only, please. Picnic tables, campsites, docks, and restrooms are available at both sites.

Palouse Falls State Park is a hidden oasis for the visitor! West of Pullman, Washington, a drive just off the beaten path takes you to an unbelievable view of the falls that cascade 198 feet into a round salt-rock canyon. The park features hiking trails, picnic tables, restrooms, sites for overnight camping, and ADA parking. 

 

History
Mountain Home is a high desert community that is a crossroads of the West. Originally a home station on the stage route, it was located 10 miles northeast of its present location and called Rattlesnake Station. It was moved to its present site when the railroad was completed in 1883. 
 
 
Mountain Home Life
Mountain Home is about 45 minutes east of Boise, across a high chaparral desert where you’ll frequently see antelope. With 11,427 residents, Mountain Home is a friendly, safe community – a place where many still don’t lock their doors. The downtown has shops, a museum, boutiques, restaurants and parks. A short walk away, tidy homes sit in groomed yards beneath shade trees. 
 
 
Mountain Home Air Force
The town is a close neighbor to the Mountain Home Air Force Base, home of the Air Force’s 366th Tactical Fighter Wing. The Air Force brings people from all over the world to Mountain Home, making it an international community. The base offers a number of community activities, including an annual air show attended by thousands. 

 

Nampa
With 81,577 residents, Nampa is the second largest city in Idaho. About twenty minutes from Boise, much of Nampa’s growth is due to Boise commuters seeking lower housing prices, less congestion and pollution, and a slower pace. 
 
 
Shopping & Entertainment
This family-oriented community provides all that and more. Shopping and entertainment opportunities abound, from Karcher Mall to the west to the many antique shops and cafés in the heart of downtown. The train depot built in 1903 and regarded as Idaho’s outstanding example of Baroque revival architecture, now houses the Canyon County Historical Museum. 
 
 
Residential Life
Lovely gardens graced with forsythia and lilac in the spring, colorful, vibrant roses and white blossom-bedecked catalpas in summer abound in the quiet downtown residential streets. Housing developments that have sprung up where Native Americans once lived along the banks of Indian Creek are interspersed with green pastures where cattle and horses graze.

 

East End History
Like the North End, east Boise's highlight is a historic street, Warm Springs Avenue. Lavish Victorian homes, many among the first residences in Boise, make the Avenue a tourist attraction. Many of the homes are geothermally heated, taking advantage of natural hot water sources for heat. The neighborhood itself dates even further back than the Victorian residences. Oregon Trail emigrants, following the Boise River, rambled through the area long before the mansions were built. 
 
 
Today and the Future
Today old Boise is preparing to meet with new Boise. Harris Ranch, the largest planned community ever proposed in Idaho, features a “new urbanism” design – combining development with consideration for the natural environment. Stretching high into the foothills, this northeastern district includes many modern communities with enviable views of the city.


The district also boasts some of Boise's most impressive parks. The educational Morrison-Knudsen Nature Center is one of northeastern Boise's main attractions, featuring nature trails, and educational exhibits about the regional environment. Julia Davis Park, hugs the neighborhood's southern boundary while Municipal Park reaches its eastern extreme. 

 

Welcome to New Plymouth, Idaho
New Plymouth is located in Payette County, Idaho. It was incorporated on February 15, 1896, and was the first planned community west of the Mississippi. The community was the combined project of a group of people supposedly dissatisfied with city life in Chicago, who formed what they called "The Plymouth Society of Chicago" in 1895. William E. Smythe, was a key founder and the chairman of the executive committee of the National Irrigation Congress and a famous irrigation promoter. Mr. Smythe was determined to found a colony to serve as a striking argument in favor of his project: irrigation. He spoke throughout the east, urging young and old men to go west in colonies and develop the country with the help of irrigation. He wanted the first colony to be called New Plymouth and wanted it located in southwestern Idaho in Payette Valley, which he had found apt for his purpose because of the extraordinary water supply from the nearby Payette River. The history of irrigation is still visible today, in the many original waterwheels that were built in the 1920’s. The city itself has a unique “horseshoe” shaped layout, with the open end facing North, the middle of which is home to a beautiful park and the main boulevard of the city. 
The community was at first called the New Plymouth Farm Village and was governed by a colony board of directors until it incorporated as a village in 1908, dropping the last two words in its name. New Plymouth was designated a city in 1948. 

 
 
Tuttle Blacksmith Shop
Tuttle Blacksmith and Welding 
The original blacksmith shop was reported to be the first business in New Plymouth, owned and operated by Walter Burke who charged 25 cents for the first job. It was originally located on the cities main street, Plymouth Avenue, on the Van Patten Lumber site. The Tuttle Blacksmith shop carries the name of Ray Tuttle who came with his family in 1893 from Dunshore, Pennsylvania. While in the army he got his blacksmith training and he shod many horses and mules; deciding that this was the occupation he wanted to pursue. Today the Tuttle Blacksmith shop is still in business at its second location on Maple Street, where they provide a number of services all steeped in a fine history of quality and pride in workmanship. 

 
 
Payette County Fair
Payette County Fair 
New Plymouth is home to the annual Payette County Fair, held at the Payette County Fairgrounds. There’s a little something for everyone at the fair including 4-H and FFA shows, Free Music, Raffles, Games, Contest, Demonstrations, and of course lots of great food to enjoy while you are there. The fair is a great way to bring the community and surrounding towns together for a fun time for all ages. 
 

 

Welcome to Nyssa, Oregon
Nyssa, Oregon is located just west of the Idaho border in Malheur County, along the Snake River and the Oregon Trail. Nyssa was originally a shipping center for sheep and stock on the Union Pacific's main trunk line. The original Fort Boise, established in the 1830s, is nearby to the southeast. The town of Nyssa was incorporated in 1903, although records conflict about the origin of the name of “Nyssa”. Some believe it is an acronym for “New York Sheep Shearing Association”, or N.Y.S.S.A., since large flocks of sheep were raised here early in the towns history. Some say the railroad named the town: The engineer who named this town had his daughter with him on the train and he asked her to pick out a name. She was studying ancient history at the time; her book was open to St. Gregory of Nyssa. She picked Nyssa as the town's name. Others still say the town was named for a Native American word meaning “sagebrush”. 

Nyssa is also known as “The Gateway to Oregon” and the “Thunderegg Capital of the World” in reference to the geologic nodules which occur within other igneous rocks, similar to geodes. 

Today the primary industry in the region is agriculture, including the cultivation of Russet potatoes, sugar beets, onions, corn, mint, and wheat. The city's economy relies greatly on the surrounding agricultural area; its several large onion and potato packaging plants. Until 2005, the Amalgamated Sugar Company (White Satin brand) owned and operated a sugar-processing plant that served as a main source of commerce. 

A quiet, close-knit community, Nyssa offers wonderful opportunities for those just starting a family or those looking to retire to a place with a little bit slower pace. 
Great recreational activities such as hunting, fishing, boating and snow skiing abound and are all within two hours in almost any direction. The Snake River provides a constant source of recreational opportunities year-round. The tall cliffs provide a stunning backdrop to boating and fishing on nearby Lake Owyhee. The dry desert climate (only ten inches of rain per year) brings great sunshine almost year round. 

 
 
Recreation
Lake Owyhee 
Lake Owyhee State Park lies next to a 53-mile-long lake formed by the Owyhee Dam, and framed by breathtaking views of the Owyhee Mountains. A scenic boat trip up the lake from the park is one of the many great experiences to be had here. There is more here than just great scenery: say hello to some of the locals! Bighorn sheep and pronghorn antelope live in the area, as well as golden eagles, coyotes, mule deer, wild horses and even the occasional mountain lion. Fossil-fiends and hikers alike are also welcome in this wilderness paradise; many use the park as base camp for exploring the badlands of Oregon. 

Succor Creek 
The towering rock structures of Succor Creek Canyon rise above prime riparian habitat and rock-hounding grounds. Though it is considered a “primitive” park area, Succor Creek provides opportunities for camping, picnicking, wildlife viewing, bird watching, and rock hounding. This is also prime territory for finding those much talked about Thundereggs!

Leslie Gulch 
Located near the Succor Creek area, Leslie Gulch is a vast and striking landscape of volcanic tuff towers and rocky spires. Leslie Gulch is known for its wind blown rock formations, wildflowers, camping, and access to Lake Owyhee. This picturesque place where wind, water, and time have created unusually sculpted towers, pinnacles, and intricate multiple layered spires is both beautiful and other-worldly. 

Fishing 
Opportunities for the angler abound in Southeast Oregon. With lakes both big and small dotting the landscape its almost as easy as shooting fish in a barrel. The Owyhee River, upper and lower, is a fine place to pull a few smallmouth bass, hatchery trout or channel catfish out of the water. Warm Springs reservoir is also nearby; there you can find catfish, perch, white crappie, and smallmouth bass. With over 20 other area lakes, rivers, and reservoirs there is no short supply of places to get your line wet. 

 

About the Area
We are located about 50 miles west of Boise, Idaho, on the Snake River, which divides Oregon and Idaho. The agriculture in this area is very diverse, ranging from flat rich irrigated row crop ground to timbered mountain ranches in the north to desert ranches to the south and west. 
 
 
More Information
The frost-free growing season averages about 160 days. There are over 50 different crops grown in the area, including vegetables, vineyards, orchards, hay and grain and specialty seed crops, along with dairies, irrigated cattle ranches and range- land.

The country’s industry is almost entirely linked to the various crops produced and to livestock raising and marketing. Rich, productive farms provide the basis for the economy, with industrial plants, seed companies, and food processing firms adding additional income.

Recreation is unlimited with good stream and lake fishing and hunting of almost every kind. The country is famous for it’s chukar and pheasant. Lots of boating in summer and skiing in winter, all within a couple hours drive. 


 
 
Ontario Area Facts
Principle Industries: Agriculture, Livestock, Dairy and Food Processing
Climate: Four Seasons
Average Max Temperature:
   January - 21F
   July - 87F
Temperature Extremes: 110F to -25F
Annual Precipitation: 9.6 inches
Annual Number of Days of Sun: 278 days per year
Elevation: Approximately 2,240 ft. to 2,842 ft. above sea level

Population
Ontario, OR...............................16,283
Nyssa, OR...................................5,798
New Plymouth, ID........................4,249 

 

Welcome to Orofino, Idaho
Orofino, Idaho is a land of all seasons, with something for everyone the whole year round. Beautiful mountains, crystal clear rivers, babbling brooks and turquoise lakes surround this cozy town of just over 3,200. 

Orofino got its start in 1898 due to the inflow of settlers and the construction of the railroad up river. The name Oro Fino means "fine gold" in Spanish. It was taken from a gold rush town called "Oro Fino" that was located near Pierce that later burned down. The post office objected to a two- word name and the town joined the two words and it became Orofino. In 1905, the Idaho State Hospital was opened. 

 
 
Dworshak Dam and Fishery
Located four miles northwest of the town of Orofino, Dworshak Dam is a hydroelectric, concrete gravity dam in Clearwater County, Idaho, on the North Fork of the Clearwater River. Originally the name was slated to be "Bruces Eddy," but the name was changed to honor Henry C. Dworshak, a United States Senator from Idaho. The dam is the highest straight-axis concrete dam in the Western Hemisphere, and the 22nd highest dam in the world. 
Construction began in June 1966, the main structure being completed in 1972, with the generators coming online in 1973. The generating capacity of the dam is 400 megawatts, with an overload capacity of 460 MW. Dworshak Dam is part of the Columbia River Basin system of dams. Dworshak Reservoir, is formed behind the dam, stretching 53 miles upstream. The North Fork of the Clearwater River, runs 2 miles downstream from the base of the dam, until it joins the South Fork of the Clearwater to form the Clearwater, which flows to the Snake River at Lewiston. 

Dworshak Dam Visitor Center is located at the top of the dam, and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Exhibits highlight the history and wildlife of the area. Tours are also available through the interior of the dam. 

Dworshak reservoir is easily the least used body of water in the state. Over 54 miles in length, with over 100 mini-camps, it's a great place to fish or just get away from it all. Best known for its Kokanee salmon and Smallmouth bass, currently it holds the state record for the largest smallie, at a whopping 8 1/2 pounds! With close to 250 miles of shoreline, you can leave your worries about being cramped or disturbed at home, there is plenty of room here even in the busiest of seasons. Truly this man made lake is an anglers paradise with a variety of fish species to test your skills against! 

 
 
Nez Perce National Historic Park
Nez Perce National Historic Park 
Since time immemorial, the Nimiipuu (or Nez Perce) have lived among the rivers, canyons and prairies of the inland northwest. The proud Nez Perce are still here and you can experience the story of a people who are still part of this beautiful landscape. Nez Perce National Historical Park includes a number of historical and cultural exhibits for your enjoyment. You can visit sites that Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark passed through or camped at on their journey across western Montana and central Idaho like the Lolo trail and Pass where you can retrace the route that Lewis and Clark took in 1805 and 1806. Don’t miss the opportunity to steep yourself in the rich history of this region! 

 

Welcome to Payette, Idaho
Located near where the Payette River and Snake River meet, the city was originally named Boomerang signifying a roundhouse on the railroad - the Oregon Short line. The city changed its name for François Payette, a French-Canadian fur trapper and later the head of the Fort Boise trading post for the British Hudson's Bay Company from 1835-1844. A large high-spirited man, he was highly regarded for his helpful assistance to the many travelers who came through the fort. After his retirement in 1844, Mr. Payette returned to Montreal, where the rest of his life falls into mystery. 

Today the city of Payette is a small close-knit community of families, and is the county seat of Payette County. It offers residents and visitors a taste of small-town life steeped in history, with the convenience of a modern locale. 

 
 
Payette Events
Payette County Fair 
Nearby New Plymouth is home to the annual Payette County Fair, held at the Payette County Fairgrounds. There’s a little something for everyone at the fair including 4-H and FFA shows, Free Music, Raffles, Games, Contest, Demonstrations, and of course lots of great food to enjoy while you are there. The fair is a great way to bring the community and surrounding towns together for a fun time for all ages. 

Payette County Museum 
Located in an historic church with exceptional stained glass windows, the museum features historical exhibits of Payette County and its founders. The museum is also home to a one of a kind 1861 6-PDR Bronze Confederate Civil War Cannon barrel. The 1861 Bronze Confederate Civil War Cannon tube is a 6 pounder - which means it shot a 6 pound projectile. The cannon tube set in Payette's Central Park, across from the post office, for many years before it was given over to the museum in 2004 for safekeeping. 
It is "one of the rarest surviving Civil War cannons among the 5559 known survivors in my files," according to Wayne E. Stark, cannon historian and expert. 
The Grand Army of the Republic organization purchased the cannon for Payette in 1912 by soliciting money from the local citizens. 

 
 
GOLF
Ontario Golf Club 
The 18-hole "Ontario" course at the Ontario Golf Club in Ontario, Oregon features 6,795 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 72. The course rating is 70.4 and it has a slope rating of 111. Designed by Bob E. Baldock, the Ontario golf course opened in 1964. Mark Copley manages the course as the Superintendent. 

Country View Golf Course 
The 9-hole "Country View" course at the Country View Golf Course in Ontario, Oregon features 5,660 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 71. The course rating is 66.4 and it has a slope rating of 104. Designed by Scott McKinney, the Country View golf course opened in 1999. Scott McKinney manages the course as the Owner/Manager/Superintendent. 

Scotch Pines Golf Course 
Scotch Pines is an 18-hole, par 72 course built in 1961. Artfully carved from the natural terrain of the Idaho countryside, Scotch Pines offers blue grass and rye fairways and bent grass greens. This beautiful course offers all the amenities you have come to expect from a great course, including it’s own restaurant where you can refuel after a long days play. 

Rolling Hills Golf Course 
Rolling Hills Golf Course in Weiser features a 9-hole course with 3,048 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 36 and a driving range. The course rating is 36.5 and it has a slope rating of 115. Originally designed by Frank James/Conrad Kranzler, the Rolling Hills golf course opened in 2001. Donna Walker manages the course as the General Manager. 

 

Location
Curled deep within the canyons where the confluence of the Salmon and the Little Salmon Rivers meet you will find the city of Riggins, Idaho. Geographically about 150 highway miles north of Boise and 120 miles south-east of Lewiston is seated at 1,821 feet above sea level and as of 2010 boasted a population of around 500. 
 
 
History
While the town life in Riggins may seem somewhat slow-paced to people today, the area has a colorful history of wilder times in the throws of the 1860's Idaho gold rush. In fact this quiet mountain town was once known as "Gouge Eye" after a vicious saloon fight in which the aforementioned happened between a couple of rough and tumble prospectors. Time went on and a much more fitting name was bestowed by citizens when they renamed their town after Richard L. Riggins, local businessman and the areas first postmaster. 

*photo via KD Swan photographs 
 
 
Things to Do!
Surrounded on all sides by the beauty of West Central Idaho this area is the attraction itself! 

The meandering scenic byways that chase roaring rivers, the high mountains and beautiful forests. Going east takes you up the Salmon River to the "River of No Return" Wilderness; some of the most stunning rugged mountain scenery in the country. Head west and you can drift down the Snake River and Hells Canyon which features world class river rafting and water craft. 

There's plenty to do in Riggins itself as well! The Riggins Rodeo in early May can be viewed from the grandstands or from the hillside overlooking the arena. White Bird Battlefield, Nez Perce National Historic Park, and the Slate Creek Ranger Station are some of the historical sites within 30 miles to the north of Riggins. 

Fishing 
With thousands of salmon and steelhead swimming up these rivers to their yearly spawning grounds, this is a premiere catch for many who love to fish. 

Hiking 
From gentle nature walks to full on peak ascension there are plenty of places to get out and hit the trails! In Riggins hiking is a year round event with each season holding different things to see. 

Water Recreation 
Of course! Surrounded by some of the mightiest rivers in the region Riggins is a prime spot to find adventure on the water! The Salmon River alone is equipped with 425 miles of water to take in! Rafting, kayaking, jet-boating, and more! 

A great location, just out of the way of the way - a small city with a big taste for adventure. Riggins makes a spectacular setting to call home base and to explore. 

 

Location
Lakes and rivers provide a striking contrast to the lands surrounding Sandpoint, Idaho. A town of just over 7,500 located far north in the panhandle of the Gem State in Bonner County, Sandpoint is a glimmering jewel. 
 
 
History
The history of Sandpoint as a settlement dates back to the year 1880 when Robert Weeks opened a general store and traded in furs. The town was known then and for a long time as “Pend Oreille” and actually existed east along the lakeshore from the current site. 
The small community grew at a slow pace until the construction of the Great Northern Railroad in 1892. This railroad brought L.D. Farmin to Sandpoint as a Great Northern agent. He filed claim on the original town site and laid out Sandpoint in 1898, ten feet above the lake's high water mark. 

 
 
Lumber Industry
As was the case with many early western towns, the city's early history was tied closely to the railroads, and to the timber industry as the Humbird and other area mills sought to harvest the timber resources of the region. In the early 1900s more than 200 men worked for the Humbird Mill in two shifts to keep up with demand. 
Timber continued to play a major role in the local economy as Sandpoint became known for the cedar electric and telegraphy poles produced by area companies. The community continued to grow slowly until World War II brought the construction of Farragut Naval Base in Bayview. This “boot camp” trained over 300,000 seamen for duty in the war and introduced them to this region. 

 

Spokane, Washington
East of the Cascade Range in Washington and on the western slope of the Coeur d'Alene Mountains next to the Idaho-Washington boundary, lies the city of Spokane. Named for the Native American tribe that makes its home in this area, it means "Children of the Sun", a fitting name as the area is known for its bright blue skies, glistening rivers and lakes. Spokane became an incorporated City on Nov. 29, 1881, encompassing 1.56 square miles. Back then, the City was known as “Spokan Falls” and had only 350 residents. The "e" was added to Spokane in 1883, and "Falls" was dropped in 1891. 

Today the City of Spokane is home to some 195,500 residents with are around 418,000 residents in the metropolitan area. A far cry from its humble beginnings it now serves as a shopping, entertainment, and medical hub for an area that includes Eastern Washington, Eastern Oregon, North Idaho, Western Montana, and southern portions of Alberta and British Columbia. The Spokane River runs through downtown with spectacular falls on the western end of the city. An outdoors lover's paradise, with white-water rafting, camping areas, hiking trails, numerous lakes, downhill and cross-country skiing, and the Centennial Trail are all close at hand. The Spokane region features a landscape of uncommon variety. Within an hours drive, visitors can find high country lakes, lonesome desert or almost anything in between. Forests, rushing rivers and lakes by the dozens share space with great rolling waves of wheat fields and stunning rock formations. It is said that from the top of nearby Mount Spokane you can see three states and two provinces-Washington, Idaho, Montana and Alberta and British Columbia. 

 
 
Riverfront Park
Riverfront Park is located at the heart of the Spokane region and serves as its centerpiece. This 100-acre park was the site of Worlds Fair Expo 74; now, it is a green space with a variety of attractions and events throughout the year and is a primary gathering place for the community. The warmer months bustle with activity with a full schedule of outdoor events in the park. The entertainment pavilion here is the location for amusement rides, the ice rink, mini-golf, and the IMAX theatre. The crowning jewel of the park is the Looff Carousel. Crafted in 1909 this antique beauty is comprised of 54 hand-carved horses and is a joyful piece of Spokane's past that continues to delight people young and old. Riverfront Park also offers spectacular viewing areas of the mighty Spokane River and Falls. 

Other area parks include Manito Park featuring the Duncan Garden, Lilac Garden, Rose Garden, Japanese Garden, and the Conservatory, as well as ponds, and picnic areas. Riverside State Park offers another view of the Spokane River with wilderness-like natural trails, picnic areas, and camping facilities just minutes from the downtown area. 

 
 
Centennial Trail
In 1979, Spokane County Parks proposed a bicycle/pedestrian pathway along the river which would run from Argonne Road to the State Line. This idea was nurtured by the Parks and Recreation Committee of the Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce in 1984 as they explored new recreational opportunities along the river and in 1986, a 10 1/2 mile trail to be built in conjunction with the Washington Centennial was proposed. A coordinated effort with the neighboring town of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho to build a trail from the Spokane House at the meeting of the Spokane and Little Spokane Rivers to the far side of Coeur d'Alene Lake, some 69 miles in length soon followed. Today there’s something for everyone on this wonderfully made paved trail. Walk, run, bike, skate, ride horseback or just picnic along the rivers edge. Designated for use of people of all ages and abilities the trail is wheelchair accessible making it a place to be enjoyed by all. 

 

History of Star
The first location of the village of Star was one mile to the east of present Star, about halfway between the present town of Star and Star-Emmett junction, and is one of the earliest communities in the Boise Valley. The Pioneer ditch (started in 1863 by M.B. Palmer) and its supply of water allowed the country between Star and Middleton to be settled early.

One of the first settlers was Ben F. Swalley who in 1863 drove his ox team and wagon onto 300 acres of land along the Boise River, a mile south of the present town. Others followed, homesteading the good farm land along the Boise River. The surrounding farms often catered to the needs of early travelers and miners providing them with food and lodging in Star, on their way to and from Boise and the mines in the Boise Basin. 

 

 
A Taste of the Old West
The first schoolhouse was built there in the 1870s on land donated by B.F. Swalley. When the settlers finished building the schoolhouse, they could not decide on a name for the building. One of the men sawed out a star and nailed it to the front door, pounding nails all around the edge of the star. This became an important landmark for miles around, and was a guide for travelers and miners. When they came to the schoolhouse with the star on the door, they could travel west one mile and find board and lodging for the night. So in time, the town became known as Star.

The village of Star began to grow, providing services to travelers and serving as a rural center for neighboring farmers and ranchers. In 1880, a post office was established in Star with Shepp Gray the first postmaster and proprietor of the general store. The early settlement also had two blacksmith shops for iron work as well as the district school house, two churches, and half a score of residences. The first official hotel was opened in 1888. In 1905, Star incorporated and established city limits reaching four miles in all directions. During the early part of the century the town flourished, growing rapidly with a number of merchants doing good business. The town had a mayor, marshal, constable, and justice of the peace. The jail was a frame building located just east of the Odd fellows Lodge Hall. 
 

 
Into the Future
Rapid growth of Star came with the confidence of the Boise Interurban Railway. In 1907, W.E. Pierce completed the electric railroad which ran from Boise to Caldwell, via Eagle, Star and Middleton, and back through Nampa and Meridian. The fare was 65 cents. The interurban also brought electricity to Star.


Star's growth declined with the closure of the Boise & Interurban in 1928. Another setback came in 1929 when the town was dis-incorporated. That year the state paved the highway east and west of Star to the city limits. Star would have had to pay for the pavement through the city. The farmers made so much disturbance about their taxes, which would have been raised to build the highway, that the city charter was turned back and the highway became the property of the state.


Over the past years the population of Star has stayed at around 500--about the same as it was early in the century. In recent years the population has grown and the 2000 census reports it at 1795 people. Star remains the trading center of a working community which earns its living for the most part from the soil. 

 

Location
Nestled in the mountains near Ketchum Sun Valley is a world renowned ski and Winter resort destination considered by many to be among the finest examples of its type anywhere on the planet. While the name "Sun Valley" is generally used to speak of the region itself - including nearby Ketchum and Hailey - this area has served as an all inclusive seasonal home for many famous individuals since first being brought into the public eye by Ernest Hemingway in the late 1930's. 
 
 
Early History
This is not by chance! From it's earliest days Sun Valley was designed to be a destination location. The success of 1932 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York was the jumping board for this visionary concept of a winter getaway developed by W. Averell Harriman, the chairman of the Union Pacific Railroad. During the winter of 1935–36, Harriman enlisted the services of an Austrian count, Felix Schaffgotsch, to travel across the western U.S. to locate an ideal site for a winter resort. 

While there were many locations considered, including Mt Rainier and Yosemite - and despite the cost of running a railroad spur to Ketchum - the combination of the scenery provided by Mt Baldy and the perfect snow conditions sealed the 
deal. 

Pioneering publicist Steve Hannigan, who had successfully promoted Miami Beach, Florida, was hired and named the resort "Sun Valley." At the time the luxurious 220 room crowning jewel of this resort area was the Sun Valley Lodge which opened in December of 1936. In addition the Swiss-style Sun Valley Inn opened in 1937 and included round shaped heated outdoor swimming pools, unique for their time at Hannigans request, "so people won't think skiing is too cold". 
 
 
Trend Setters 
It was this visionary design that would attract the trend setters of the day, including celebrities like Glenn Miller, Desi Arnaz, Milton Berle, and Marilyn Monroe. The lush accomodations and easy access to exceptional recreation has kept Sun Valley in the forefront of the worlds superstars into modern times as well! Big names like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Mark Zuckerberg, Mats Wilander, Warren Buffett, Tom Hanks, Oprah Winfrey, Clint Eastwood, Bruce Willis are all counted among frequent visitors and seasonal residents today.

The heart of Sun Valley features a wonderful array of boutique shops filled with the works of local artisans and the bounty of the Gem State. Home to a number of events, there is always something going on worth enjoying - from the Trailing of the Sheep, and Christmas in Sun Valley to the Ketchum Arts Festival - family, fun, and culture are close at hand. 

A gateway to the heart of the Rocky Mountains, beautiful Stanley Idaho is just a short trip from town. Recreational opportunities abound including everything from bird watching, hiking, and fishing to mountain climbing and more! The rich history of vision continues to make Sun Valley a place unlike any other. 

 

Perfectly Located
The Tri-Cities is a metropolitan area in the southeastern part of Washington, consisting of Benton and Franklin counties. The cities of Kennewick, Pasco, and Richland make up the principal cities for the metropolitan area and are located at the confluence of the Yakima, Snake, and Columbia rivers.

As of April 1, 2009, the population of the bi-county metropolitan area was estimated at around 242,000 by the Washington State Office of Financial Management, Forecasting Division. If the Tri-Cities were a single city, it would be the fourth largest city in the state of Washington, just behind Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma. The Tri-Cities Airport, located in the city of Pasco (in Franklin County), provides the region with commercial and private air service. 
 
 
300 Days of Sun
Residents here enjoy 300 sun-filled days and a year-round outdoor paradise where river action abounds on the Columbia, Snake, and Yakima rivers. All three cities offer a number of free boat launch sites, and the size of the river itself creates ample space for fishing, surface water sports, and sailing. Recreational and sports enthusiasts love the Tri-Cities for it's many available outdoor activites and opportunities. Golfers too find the area's ten beautiful courses a challenge for even the most experienced pro, but enjoyable by the beginner as well. 



Kennewick's Columbia Park is the largest park in the Tri-Cities. Bordering several miles of the Columbia River, it is run by the Kennewick Parks and Recreation Department. Within the park, there is a popular golf course, duck and fishing ponds, and a playground known as the Playground of Dreams. 
 
 
Washington Wine Country
After savoring just one of the local premium wines, visitors will understand why the area has been called the "Heart of Washington Wine Country". The Tri-Cities boasts more than 160 wineries within a 60-mile radius, and produce some of the finest wines in the region and the world. 

 

Agricultural Area
Twin Falls was laid out in 1904 as a planned community to serve settlers arriving to take advantage of a new irrigation project and land grant act. Water allowed prosperous farms to spring up on the vast volcanic plains, giving rise to the name Magic Valley for what has become one of the world’s most productive agricultural regions. As the retail and services hub for more than 225,000 people, this city of 37,000 is also becoming known as a leader in education, health care, and transportation. 
 
 
Location
Twin Falls is located at the edge of the Snake River Canyon, where the Perrine Bridge rises 486 feet above the canyon to link the town to I-84 just to the north. Two golf courses and a community park are in the canyon, and a canyon rim trail provides spectacular views. A few miles upriver Shoshone Falls, “The Niagara of the West,” plummets 212 feet over a 1,000 foot-wide basalt base. 
 
 
Development
The heart of downtown Twin Falls is its City Park, some three miles east of the river and the site of frequent community arts and cultural events. Quiet streets, early nineteenth century bungalows surrounded by shade trees and well-trimmed lawns, make up much of the downtown residential area. While some new developments are interspersed in this district, many of the newer housing developments are northeast of town, in the direction of Shoshone Falls. Housing costs in Twin Falls are at least 20% below the national average. 

 

Welcome to Vale, Oregon
Vale is located on the Malheur River at the point where the wagons using the Oregon Trail crossed the river. Jonathan Keeney built the first building here on the banks of the Malheur River in 1864 – a crude log cabin that served travelers until the Stone House was built in 1872. The community was named Vale, meaning "valley" when the post office was established; the first school in Vale opened in 1887. The community was incorporated in 1889 and much later became the county seat for Malheur County. Malheur County itself is the only county in Oregon in the Mountain Time zone. 

Today Vale is the heart of a rich agriculture area, with row crops being raised in the valley, dairy cows on the benches and beef cattle in the low hills surrounding the city. Oregon Trail Mushroom and Eagle-Picher Industries have plants in the Vale area. Oregon Trail Mushroom uses the natural occurring hot water from local springs in their operation. Cattle and livestock continue to play a role in the local economy with one of the largest livestock auction yards in Oregon holding a sale each Wednesday. Vale’s downtown area has recently received a beautiful renovation, including having the main streets repaved and modernized as well as new lighting, benches, and landscaping – the people of Vale are proud of their city, and it shows! 

 
 
Things to See and Places to Go
Rinehart Stone House 
The original Rinehart Stone House was built in 1872 and was the first permanent building in Malheur County. This rustic sandstone building was located on the Oregon Trail replacing an earlier log house built by Jonathan Keeney. The Stone House provided a wayside stop for trail weary travelers until the early 1900s. It was also a haven for settlers during the Bannock Paiute uprising of 1878. Today, the recently restored Stone House is a museum displaying period relics and photos, as well as interpretative exhibits about the Oregon Trail. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the museum is conveniently located on Main Street South in downtown Vale. 

Vale Heritage Reflections Mural Society 
Vale has its own outdoor art gallery, featuring some 25 murals depicting Vale's history on the Oregon Trail, on the walls of various buildings throughout the town and on four metal murals placed outside the city limits to welcome visitors. The Vale Heritage Reflections Mural Society was founded in November of 1992 by individuals who wanted to revitalize Vale's economy and provide economic growth through tourism. The Mural Society paints new murals each year, with the money for the murals raised through donations, a live auction and a street sale. In addition, the mural society receives some grants, but money from the community is still its primary source of funding. 

The Rex Theatre 
Built in 1914 there is not a lot of information about the theatres early history. In 1989 Sandijean Fuson and Mike McLaughlin purchased the theater because the theater had been closed for several years and they wanted to provide something more for the kids of Vale to do. Family movies have been shown here since, although if there is a home football game you will find the theatre dark as the whole town proudly supports Vale High School sports. In 2006 two severe windstorms destroyed a portion of the roof causing damage to the interior of the theater. Since that time much work has been done to bring the theater back to it former glory. Its historical renovation preserved the unique 
“Art Deco” artwork adoring the columns, restored the original wood floors, the balcony now has a VIP booths for special guests, and the main floor seats have cup holders and over 30 inches of leg room between new cloth seats. There are very few independent and community based theaters left in the USA and Vale is fortunate to be home to one of them. 

 
 
Recreation
Bully Creek Dam and Reservoir 
Bully Creek Dam and Reservoir are on the Bully Creek about 8 miles northwest of the creeks confluence with the Malheur River, and a short 10 miles from Vale itself. Forested areas at the reservoir provide wonderful opportunities for viewing migrating birds. In the spring, fall, and winter you may see ducks, grebes, loons, and hawks. Nearby a red rock formation sometimes plays home to Rock Wrens and Golden Eagles. The reservoir is 985 surface acres with 7 miles of shoreline. This spot is a favorite of anglers with available fish species that include smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, rainbow, and black crappie. Sparse vegetative cover of sagebrush and grass provides habitat for small mammals and birds as well. 

Lake Owyhee 
Lake Owyhee State Park lies next to a 53-mile-long lake formed by the Owyhee Dam, and framed by breathtaking views of the Owyhee Mountains. A scenic boat trip up the lake from the park is one of the many great experiences to be had here. There is more here than just great scenery: say hello to some of the locals! Bighorn sheep and pronghorn antelope live in the area, as well as golden eagles, coyotes, mule deer, wild horses and even the occasional mountain lion. Fossil-fiends and hikers alike are also welcome in this wilderness paradise; many use the park as base camp for exploring the badlands of Oregon. 

Hunting 
Vale is located in the heart of pheasant country. Pheasant season starts in mid-October and lasts until mid-December. Chukar season is from mid-October to January 31. Archery enthusiasts can use the 80 acre West Bench Archery Range from April through September. Hunting is very diversified in Malheur County with upland game birds such as dove, pheasant, quail, grouse and chukars and bigger game animals such as antelope, deer, elk and big horn sheep. With your license you can go it alone or choose from several area guide services that can show you the spots only locals know about. 

Succor Creek 
The towering rock structures of Succor Creek Canyon rise above prime riparian habitat and rock-hounding grounds. Though it is considered a “primitive” park area, Succor Creek provides opportunities for camping, picnicking, wildlife viewing, bird watching, and rock hounding. This is also prime territory for finding those much talked about Thundereggs!

Leslie Gulch 
Located near the Succor Creek area, Leslie Gulch is a vast and striking landscape of volcanic tuff towers and rocky spires. Leslie Gulch is known for its wind blown rock formations, wildflowers, camping, and access to Lake Owyhee. This picturesque place where wind, water, and time have created unusually sculpted towers, pinnacles, and intricate multiple layered spires is both beautiful and other-worldly. 

 

The Town of Wasilla, Alaska
Located in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, the town of Wasilla has a total area of about 11 miles across. The Dena'ina (Tanaina) Indians called the area Benteh - meaning 'among the lakes' - which is apt as Wasilla is surrounded by many lakes, including Lake Lucille and Wasilla Lake. Legend has it that the town was named after a respected local Dena'ina Indian, Chief Wasilla. In the Dena'ina language, "Wasilla" is said to mean 'breath of air'. Other sources claim the chief derived his name from the Russian language and that 'Vasili' is a variation of the Russian name 'William'. Wasilla backwards spells out "All I Saw", which some fallaciously believe is the reason for the name. 
The current town site was established in 1917 at the intersection of the Knik-Willow mining trail and the newly constructed Alaska Railroad. Wasilla’s proximity to the gold fields and railroad service lured residents from other parts of the state and country to relocate to the new town. It was a supply base for gold, most notably at Hatcher Pass, and coal mining in the region through World War II. 
Today the local economy here is as diverse as the people. Many residents are employed in a variety of city, borough, state, federal, retail and professional service positions – with about 30% commuting to Anchorage or other regional cities. Tourism, agriculture, wood products, steel, and concrete products are also part of the economy. 

Wasilla sits between two river valleys carved by prehistoric glaciers. The city is sheltered from extreme weather by the Talkeetna Mountains and nestled between two beautiful lakes—Wasilla and Lucille. This unique locale appeals to those who seek an Alaskan lifestyle while raising a family, taking advantage of economic prospects, or retiring in comfort. 
The George Parks Highway, Glenn Highway, and other roads connect the city to Anchorage, the remainder of the state and Canada. A town airport, featuring a paved 3,700-foot airstrip, provides scheduled commuter and air taxi services. The Alaska Railroad serves Wasilla and floatplanes land at Wasilla Lake, Jacobsen Lake, and Lake Lucille. 
Wasilla is the commercial and retail center for the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in South-central Alaska. Large enough to have the metropolitan amenities we’ve all come rely on, with a blossoming growth center for business, yet small enough to preserve the charm, security, and familiarity of small-town living that we love. The people of Wasilla enjoy affordable land and housing, unparalleled recreation, and a thriving economy. 

 
 
Recreation
Wasilla is the home of the world renowned Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race and the Tesoro Iron-Dog 2000, the world’s longest snowmobile race. Fishing, swimming, boating, biking, and hiking are popular activities during summer’s long daylight hours. Mountains, lakes, streams, wetlands, tundra, and boreal forests are within easy reach, making the Wasilla area a great place for recreation regardless of season. 
Big Lake is the name for both a beautiful lake and a community with 2,000 year-round residents. Located at the west end of the Mat-Su Valley, 15 miles north of Wasilla, there are numerous winter and summer recreational opportunities including fishing, boating, snow mobiling, cross country skiing, wildlife viewing, and sled dog racing. It’s easy to understand why the larger percentage of the housing in the Big Lake area is recreational. 
Independence Mine State Historical Park is set in scenic Hatcher Pass, high in the rugged Talkeetna Mountains. About 17 miles from Wasilla, the park contains the abandoned buildings and machinery of a hard rock gold mining operation. In summer, the park is a popular area for hiking, berry picking, and recreational gold panning. Heavy snowfall in the winter also makes the park a popular snowboarding, cross country skiing, and snow-mobile destination. 
Nancy Lake State Recreation Area, with its network of 130 lakes and ponds is a prime area for hiking, canoeing, camping, skiing, and snow mobiling, just 25 miles north of Wasilla. 
Iditarod 
Wasilla is home to the Iditarod headquarters and is the official starting point for the race. The Iditarod Days Festival runs for ten days before the start of the race. Mushers from around the world compete in "The Last Great Race on Earth," also known as Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race and Iditarod Days Festival. Covering more than 1,150 miles of rugged terrain with teams of 12 to 16 dogs, the race is a contest of animal and human endurance and a link to Alaska’s past, when dog sleds were the primary mode of transportation. The present-day race is the result of efforts by two well-known and widely-recognized past Wasilla residents: Dorothy Page and Joe Redington, Sr. 
Mat-Su King Salmon Derby 
The Greater Wasilla Chamber of Commerce offers more than $20,000 in prizes. The winning fish may be caught anywhere in the Susitna drainages and the Little Susitna River. A challenge awaits even the most seasoned angler! 
Tesoro Iron Dog 2000 
In the world’s longest, most challenging snowmobile race, two-racer teams travel almost 2,000 miles to Nome from the starting point at Wasilla and finish at Fairbanks. Drivers face subzero temperatures, blinding snowstorms, and treacherous terrain in a test of both athletic endurance and mechanical skill. 

 
 
Health & Education
Matanuska-Susitna College has its main campus on a 950-acre site halfway between Wasilla and Palmer. An extension college of the University of Alaska Anchorage serves approximately 1,650 students each semester in a modern 102,676 square foot facility. The school offers Associate of Applied Science degrees in Accounting, Architectural and Engineering Technology, Human Services, Fire Service Administration, Office Management and Technology, Refrigeration and Heating Technology, Small Business Administration, Telecommunications, Electronics and computer Technology, as well as a Microcomputer Support Specialist Program through the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. 
Mat-Su Regional Medical Center is a brand new facility that opened in January 2006 offering state-of-the-art medical care. The $101 million 200,000 square foot hospital is located on 30 acres right off the Parks Highway. The hospital includes 74 beds in private rooms, five operating rooms, an enlarged emergency department including special bays for trauma, cardiac and orthopedic needs, a full complement of diagnostic imaging equipment, an expanded medical and surgical wing, and a cardiovascular department with cardiac catheterization lab. 
Wasilla Library serves residents of the greater Wasilla area with funding from the City of Wasilla and the Mat-Su Borough. The Wasilla Library is the fourth busiest library in the state and participates in the state interlibrary loan system. 

 

Welcome to Weiser, Idaho
Located at the confluence of the Weiser and Snake Rivers, the City of Weiser is the county seat of Washington County. Revolutionary War hero, Peter Weiser, who was a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and mountain man, named the town over 200 years ago. Weiser takes pride in its rich history and is represented by many of its original buildings, which are now on the National Historic Register. Some of these historic buildings include the Galloway House, Pythian Castle and the Union Pacific Train Depot. 
Today, the City of Weiser is lovely quiet city tied together through traditional family values and a deep sense of community. Weisers’ motto says it all: "We Love Our Kids"! Strong natural resources, agricultural and ranching heritage, continue to play a key role in the City of Weiser and the cities sense of price can be seen in our recent downtown revitalization, which includes several new parks and our beautiful new Vendome Events Center. New industry is growing here as well with businesses in forest products, food processing, and technical innovations making their new homes here for the future. 

 
 
Fiddling Capital of the World
The National Old Time Fiddler’s Contest 
Weiser could easily be called the “fiddling capital of the world” and its claim to that right is the National Old Time Fiddler’s Contest that has been held here since 1953. Fiddling is nothing so new-fangled though, as there have been fiddle contests of one kind or another held here as far back as 1914. The festival is held at the beginning of summer, during the third full week in June. It draws national media coverage and thousands of people from all around flock to the Weiser area. Hometown fiddler’s Vanessa Carr and twin sister Stephanie Carr have gained national and local honors as being the only duet fiddlers to win 4 consecutive titles, which has earned them the title of the "Master Fiddlers of Weiser." 

Washington County Fair 
The Washington County Fair brings folks from all over southwestern Idaho for entertainment, Country fair exhibits of art, crafts, baking, canning, needlework, flowers and horticulture, a livestock show, a parade and rodeo Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 

 
 
Recreation
The region around Weiser may lack some of the striking elevation changes of the nearby Hells Canyon area, but the lands here are by no means flat plains - rolling hills and rivers flow through this locale, lending their harmony to the view overlooked by mountains. 
Although agriculture is abundant here, bird hunting and fishing are important to the people locally and to many of the visitors who come here. Don’t let the subtle landscape fool you, the recreational opportunities offered here are no less real. Places for boating, swimming, hiking and more are abundant, especially along the Snake River to the west and in the foothill regions to the east. 

Brownlee Reservoir 
Brownlee Reservoir is the largest of three dams in the Hells Canyon Complex in Idaho. This 57-mile long reservoir separating Idaho and Oregon is in many experts opinion the best warm water fishery in the western United States. In 1988 and 1989 the Idaho fish and Game and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in cooperation with Idaho Power Company took a creel census; it showed that Brownlee produced more fisherman hours than any other body of water in the state, with the exception of the ocean. You will find a number of fish species here including smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, bluegills, bull heads, channel catfish, blue catfish, flathead catfish, black crappie, white crappie, red eared sunfish, and rainbow trout. 

Black Canyon - Letha 
The Black Canyon - Letha section provides an interesting tour through the nearby Emmett Valley. In many areas, the river is interwoven around islands, requiring quick decisions and maneuvering to follow the preferred course. Due to the number of diversion drops throughout the river boaters should exercise caution, particularly when the water is high. Fishing for trout is good here with small-mouth bass fishing and carp fishing can be productive further downstream. 

Lake Cascade (Cascade Reservoir) 
Cascade Reservoir is so huge (17 miles long by 4 miles wide) that it is said canoe and kayak paddlers have to be cautious about getting stuck in the middle of the lake in a big wind or even worse: big-time waves and heavy chop. There are a number of campgrounds and 7 boat ramps to take your bigger toys out on the water. Fish species range from rainbow trout and coho salmon, warm water species of smallmouth bass, bullhead catfish, tiger musky, channel catfish, crappie, and most especially perch. Lake Cascade is one of southwestern Idaho's most popular boating and fishing spots for locals and visitors alike. Recreational development near the lake makes Lake Cascade an ideal place for the whole family. 

Rolling Hills Golf Course 
The 9-hole course at the Rolling Hills Golf Course in Weiser features 3,048 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 36 and a driving range. The course rating is 36.5 and it has a slope rating of 115. Originally designed by Frank James/Conrad Kranzler, the Rolling Hills golf course opened in 2001. Donna Walker manages the course as the General Manager. You don’t have any excuse for your handicap now, this course is right in town! 


Mark and Monica Knight | Contact Us
Mark Knight 
208-577-1487
Monica Knight 208-571-8379

660 East Franklin Road #220 - Meridian, ID 83642
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